Tracey's Journal

This is just a place for me to post some pictures, write a few lines, and hopefully share some of my crafts.

Saturday, June 24, 2006

Explanation of short row heel

I've had so many people ask me questions about how to do the short row heel on the Decor Accents' EFG or FG sock loom I decided to post a tutorial here. The following tutorial is an explanation of Isela Phelp's ribbed sock short row heel pattern.

The directions are written for a 48 peg loom. I found it easier for my first few socks to run an extra copy of the decreasing and increasing page for my loom size so I could check off each box on the chart when I finished a row.

The first row of your heel will be pegs 1-24. You will knit pegs 1-24 take the loop off peg 25, wrap the peg put the stitch back on, leaving 2 loops on peg 25.
Knit back on pegs 24-2, take the loop off peg 1 wrap the peg put the stitch back on, leaving 2 loops on peg.
Knit pegs 2-23, wrap peg 24, leaving 2 loops on peg.
Knit pegs 23-3, wrap peg 2, leaving 2 loops on peg.
Knit pegs 3-22 and continue on following Isela's chart till you knit your last decreasing row of pegs 16-10, wrap peg 9.
You will then have finished decreasing and you will start increasing.
To start increasing knitting pegs 10-17, when you come to the 1st peg with 2 wraps (peg 17 for your first row) you will knit 2 over 1 on that peg.
Knit pegs 17-9 (yes you will knit peg 17 twice, this prevents holes in your heel), knitting 2 over 1 on peg 9.
Knit pegs 9-18, knitting 2 over 1 on peg 18.
Continue in this manner until you have knit your final row of pegs 25-1. Once you have knit your final row of pegs 25-1. You will be finished with your heel and you will start knitting in the round again down the length of your foot. You will need to allow about 1 1/2" for your toe section, so stop knitting 1 1/2" shy of the length of your foot.
Once you have knit your foot section you will begin your toe section. It is exactly the same as your heel. The only difference being once you have finished your decreasing and increasing and are back at peg 1 you are finished knitting. You then have to stitch up your toe.
There are several methods to stitch up your toe. Isela's pattern calls for the zig-zag removal, but I prefer the Kitchener stitch.
I remove my stitches onto 2 knitting needles and use the Kitchener stitch to close up my toe. Your stitches will match as long as you put 1/2 your stitches on one needle (in your case pegs 1-24) and the other 1/2 on the other needle (in your case pegs 25-48).

The only difference between the heel and toe is that you don't start knitting in the round when you finish the toe, you close your toe. Your seam will be on the top of your toes, but if you use the Kitchener stitch you won't truly have a seam. I have pics on my blog of the zig-zag removal and the Kitchener stitch. I used both methods on my first pair of socks and I like the look of the Kitchener stitch much better, and I don't think it was any more difficult to do either.

Wednesday, June 14, 2006

Side view showing short row heel

This is a picture of the same sock showing the short row heel.  You can see  the heel protruding from the body of the sock since I continued to knit the heel, but not the body of the sock.  You knit 1/2 of the diameter of the sock decreasing a stitch at the beginning and ending of each row till you reach the peg designated in the instructions as your last decreasing peg, then you start to increase at the beginning and ending of each row until you are back at peg one.  Then you will start knitting in the round again to knit the length of your foot.  I hope this has answered some questions for some people. :)
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1st sock of 3rd pair completed

This the finished sock.  This sock is made from Knit Picks Simply Stripes yarn.  I knit 20 rows of K2P2 ribbing, 45 additional rows till I reached the heel, knit a garter stitch heel, 70 more rows till I reached the toe, then I knit the toe and sewed it together with the Kitchener stitch.  I can't wait till cold weather so I can test all these socks out.  Right now in TN it is getting into the 90's during the day, and if we're lucky dropping to low 70's at night.  So bare feet are the way to go right now.  Besides with my own personal summers (isn't getting older grand) I want to stay as cool as possible. :)
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Close up of garter stitch heel

Here is the garter stitch heel close up.  It really feels nice and cushy. :)  I can't wait to get the other sock done so I can wear them.  I will finish up the heel on the mate tonight I believe, then I have to knit down the length of this LONG (compliments of my Dad) foot. :)
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Sunday, June 04, 2006

3rd pair started

Hi y'all.  I've started my 3rd pair already.  I told you I was addicted! :)  This pair is also done with Knit Picks yarn.  The color is a little off in the photo.  What is showing up as blue is actually a pretty purple color.  I'm planning on making the leg portion a little longer this time, and doing the heel with a garter stitch.  I'd love to learn some new ways to knit socks.  I'm currently doing a short row heel and toe.  If anybody comes up with a stitch pattern for the leg besides ribbing or plain knit stitch, or another way to knit the heel and toe besides short rows I'd love to have a copy, hint, hint. :)
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Removal for Kitchener Stitch

This is my sock over half way removed from my loom in preparation of doing the Kitchener stitch to close my toe.
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2nd pair of socks

This is the 2nd pair of socks I completed.  This was also done on the Decor Accents EFG sock loom.  I used Knit Picks yarn for this, and try as I might, these are still fraternal twins. :)
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1st pair of socks finished

This is my first complete pair of knit socks.  I knit them on Decor Accents Extra Fine Gauge sock loom using the ribbed sock pattern written by Isela.  The yarn is Lyon Magic Stripes.  As you can see they are not idential twins, but are fraternal twins. :)
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Thursday, June 01, 2006

Kitchener Stitch

There have been a few questions on how I finish the toe of my socks. I do use the Kitchener stitch. I divide my loom in half and remove each half onto a knitting needle, then proceed with the Kitchener stitch for needles. I don't do the Kitchener stitch directly from the loom.

You do not need to know how to needle knit to do this. You are going to be removing the stitches from the needles with a tapestry needle, so no needle knitting involved. :) The link I provided above (the title) has a wonderful video on how to do the Kitchener stitch. I hope that helps, if you have any further questions, just ask. :)
 
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